Tag Archives: vmworld

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VMworld Session Full- DON’T PANIC

If you’re planning your schedule for the upcoming VMworld Europe event, you’ll no doubt find that some sessions are at capacity. Don’t panic- there’s still options open for you.

1- Is the session being duplicated? Some sessions are available at multiple times- for example vSphere Clustering Deep Dive, Part 1: vSphere HA and DRS has a second showing added on Thursday morning.

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2- Turn up in advance of the session. If you arrive in plenty of time there is usually a wait queue outside the hall- this queue is for people who haven’t signed up in advance and the conference staff start to let these delegates in a few minutes before the session started. From personal experience the past few years at the Barcelona event I haven’t had a problem getting in by this route.

I’d suggest using the star-shaped “favourite” button in the Schedule Builder- this pops it in your calendar as a reminder.

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3- If you really can’t fit a session into your timetable, most sessions are recorded and you can catch up online after the event. The conference is only a few days long so a certain level of prioritisation is always required. I’d suggest considering which sessions you’re going to benefit the most from seeing live and having the opportunity to talk with your peers (and possibly the presenters themselves) about whilst at VMworld.

A couple more related points of note: The VMworld app is being launched tomorrow (23rd October 2018) which will allow you to work with your schedule on your phone, plus the “Agenda Export” feature of the Schedule Builder will be available from the 30th October which means you can export your timetable straight from the website to your calendar of choice.

Get planning! The event kicks off in less than two weeks- see you there.

 

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Dev 4 the Ops Team Preview

In one month from now I’ll be speaking at VMworld in Barcelona with a concise session on coding skills for the IT operations team. To quote the abstract for the session:

I believe every IT Ops person, SysAdmin, and vSphere administrator should do some coding

This belief is one I definitely work to in my day-to-day IT activities, and something I encourage my colleagues to do as well. My intention isn’t that every Systems Administrator becomes a full-time developer, writing (or contributing to) large-scale applications. However, I do mean for this coding to be more than just using the command line in place of a perfectly good graphical user interface.

imageA good base in coding leads to better understanding of how admin tasks should be performed and it can provide you with better documentation and more auditable processes.  Even small amounts of coding can greatly improve your productivity when tasks must be repeated and can be a stepping stone to more automation of the IT environment.

Here is the remainder of the abstract:

… this session will explain how to get started. This session will cover the core concepts required along with some PowerShell/ PowerCLI examples. The session is aimed at vSphere admins with little coding experience and they should come away understanding that coding isn’t something to be fearful of.

To see the whole presentation, come along to the VMTN theatre on Wednesday afternoon, or catch up after the show with the recording (link tbc). Click Here to view the session in the VMworld Europe Content Catalog and add it to your schedule.

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VMworld Europe Session Builder

DfnJhy1W0AAI2LLWith VMworld US 2018 out of the way, focus turns to the European conference now only a couple of months away. For attendees of the Barcelona event, 25th September is a date to put in your diary as the “Schedule Builder” will be released.

The Schedule Builder is used to book yourself seats in the hundreds of sessions which will be held during the week. Although pre-booking is not strictly necessary it does mean that you are guaranteed a space and don’t have to wait in a queue in the hope that enough seats are free when the session starts.

Here are my top tips:

  • Visit the Content Catalog now to see what sessions have already been listed. Favourite any sessions that catch your interest. There are no dates/times/rooms set yet, so don’t worry about timetables and scheduling.
  • Mark the 25th September 2018 in your calendar to visit the Schedule Builder and book your seat.
  • Keep checking back as the event date draws closer. More sessions will be added as the event draws closer (for example the Hackathon, vBrownBag, and {code} sessions are not currently listed)- and possibly even after the doors open if new products are announced at the show.
  • If a session you’re interested in is fully booked, don’t panic- just turn up before the session starts and join the wait queue. The occasions I’ve done this I’ve had no problem getting in. Also keep your eyes open for repeat sessions being added for the more popular breakouts.
  • If you do end up with an unresolvable clash, remember that the breakouts are all recorded and posted online- I’d suggest picking the topic you’ll benefit most from seeing live, or the one you’re most likely to follow up on whilst at the conference.

Hopefully this is helpful, and I look forward to seeing you all in Barcelona soon.

VMworld 2018 Early-Bird Registration Available

Registration for VMworld 2018 opened this week (8th May) with Early-Bird discounts available until 15th June for the US event, or 27th July for the European event. This gives prospective attendees a $300 / €200 discount on the regular price which runs up until the day before the respective events. This year VMworld US will again be in Las Vegas at the end of August, with the European leg staying in Barcelona but moving to early November.

I’ve seen no official word on why the EMEA event has moved down the calendar, but this does put it in a different financial quarter to the US event both for VMware and their partners. This should allow for more flexibility with both product releases and marketing budget through the year, especially when combined with the recent partner “Empower” event and Dell Technologies World both sat in the spring.

Full details of the event, along with the registration details are available at vmworld.com. The site features a link at the top of the page to choose between the Las Vegas and Barcelona events.

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VMworld 2018 Call for Papers

The Call for Papers for VMworld 2018 is now live, running until March 13th. As with last year, this is for both the US and Europe legs of the event, even though the Barcelona date has been moved to early November. This seems a little odd given the speed of change in tech, submitting a topic eight months before the event, but I’d hope that space is left in the program for new developments and releases to be covered when the show comes across the Atlantic.

If you’re interested in submitting a session, Eric Siebert has some good tips over on vsphere-land.com on how to get it approved. Having never submitted for the conference (with the exception of a vBrownbag appearance), I’m not going to offer any further advice from that point of view, but I do have one request as a regular attendee:

Appropriate Naming

Please, please, title and describe your session appropriately. Whilst phrases like “Deep Dive” or “Customer Story” often draw in the audience, they are going to leave disappointed if they get an introductory level view of the product, or the only reference to the customer is “we sold it to them”. A big crowd leaving bad feedback isn’t going to impress.

At last year’s event I saw some excellent Deep Dives – the vSAN Troubleshooting DeepDive (STO1315BE) and the vSphere 6.5 Host Resources Deep Dive (SER1872BE) are great examples of talks with some awesome in-depth content. However I was in another “Deep Dive” where the presenters spent a sizeable amount of time giving an introduction to the product in question before trundling through marketing slides. I’m not going to name and shame here- I raised it appropriately in the session feedback at the time- but it did feel like I’d wasted an hour out of my schedule. Time at the event is valuable and limited, so attendees try and get the most out of every hour.

Don’t let this detract anyone from attending and registering for sessions- in my experience the majority of sessions are well labelled in the Content Catalog- but if you are thinking of presenting please make sure to describe your session correctly and help improve the experience even more. I’m looking forward to seeing what sessions are going to be on the list this year, and hoping to be there in person (subject to obtaining a conference pass).