Tag Archives: vmware

vSAN- Controller Driver is (not) VMware Certified

In the process of upgrading a vSAN ReadyNode cluster from ESXi 6.5 to 6.7 a warning appeared in the vSAN Health check. The first host in the cluster had gone through the upgrade and was now showing the warning “Controller driver is VMware certified” (Note 1 in the image below, click on it for a larger view). The Dell HBA330 card was using an older version of the driver (2 in the image below) than recommended (3).

image

All workloads were still online, but running VMware Update Manager (VUM) did not clear this warning. Looking in the VUM patch listing showed the driver for ESXi 6.5 (4) but not the version recommended for 6.7.

image

Solution

It was necessary to manually load these replacement drivers in. A quick google showed they could be sourced from VMware’s download site. Extract the ZIP file from the download and then use the “Upload from File” option in VUM (5) to upload the ZIP file which was inside (in this case “VMW-ESX-6.7.0-lsi_msgpt3-17.00.01.00-offline_bundle-9702440.zip“). The new driver should then appear in the list (6) and will automatically be added to the “Non-Critical Host Patches” baseline (7). Final remediation is now just a case of applying that updating baseline to the host.

SNAGHTML3018550

In this particular instance the hosts were Dell PowerEdge R630 vSAN ReadyNodes with the HBA330 SAS HBA Controller option but the principles outlined in this post should apply to other configurations with the same symptoms.

VMworld

VMworld 2019 Dates

It was announced this week that registration for VMware’s VMworld 2019 conference will open at the beginning of May so now seems a good time to look at some of the key dates for the event.

Call For Proposals – March-April

The CFP process seems to be a little different this year being only open to VMware Employees (till -April 9th). However Non-VMW staff can submit an outline for review, applications for which are accepted through to April 16th. The reviews then happen through May and submitters should find out by June 11th.

The process is running concurrently for both US and EU events and full details are on the vmworld.com site.

Early Bird Registration 7 May

If you’re definitely going (and why wouldn’t you?!) then Early Bird pricing is the way to go. For VMworld Europe this deal runs from registration opening on 7th May through to 27 July and cuts the price by 200 Euro.

For the US event Early Bird Registration ends 15 June and offers a $300 saving on the regular rate.

Remember, there’s additional discounts on top of these offers for VMUG Advantage members, VCP holders, and Alumni.

Content Catalog 18 June

The release of the content catalog is the first chance to see the sessions on offer for both EU and US events. Whilst timings aren’t announced at this stage it’s a good opportunity to start marking the breakout sessions that are of interest.

The sessions listed can change, with some being added or possibly removed as the catalog develops so keep popping back during this period to keep up to date

US Session Builder 16 July

The Schedule Builder is where you can plan out your week and the US one goes live about a month before the event. A top tip is to get in early on the day this goes live and book in your “must see” sessions. As with the content catalog, keep popping back as the event draws near (and even after the keynote) as new sessions are always added in- particularly those tied around as-yet-unannounced product releases.

VMworld US 25-29 August

After a couple of years out in Vegas, VMworld US returns to the Moscone Centre in San Francisco for 2019.

EU Session Builder 25 September

Like the US session builder detailed above, the timetabling function for the European leg is released a few weeks before the event itself.

VMworld Europe 4-7 November

The European leg is back in Barcelona again this year and keeping to the November dates from last year.

 

Full details of the conference can be found on vmworld.com

VMworld2018Sign

vSphere 6.0- time to upgrade

vCenter-logoIf you’re running VMware vCenter and ESXi 6.0 it’s time to start planning to upgrade as General Support ends on 12 March 2020- one year from now and five years from it’s release. Thankfully the upgrade from 6.0 to 6.5 or 6.7 is usually quite straightforward, and VMware have put a lot of work into streamlining this process.

Looking at the Product Lifecycle Matrix other notable products in the VMware stable worth keeping an eye on include NSX for vSphere (NSXv) 6.2, Site Recovery Manager (SRM) 6.0 and 6.1, and vSAN 6.0-6.2.

Powered Off VM cannot be Powered On

Symptoms

A powered off VM on ESXi 6.5 will not power on and returns the error “Failed to power on virtual machine…. The attempted operation cannot be performed in the current state (Powered off)”.

(i.e. the VM cannot be powered on BECAUSE it is not powered on!)

2019-02-19 (12)

Prior to being powered down the VM properties had just been modified. In this particular case it was immediately following a manual Ubuntu install and the install DVD (from a datastore ISO) was disconnected and the CD Drive switch to” “Host Device”. These operations were performed from the ESXi Web interface.

Repeated attempts to start the VM all fail the same way.

Solution

Unregister the VM, then locate the vmx file in the datastore and re-register it. The VM should now power on.

image

VMworld 2018 Banner

vSAN Scalable File Services

One of the new developments that caught my eye at VMworld this year was the introduction of file services to the VMware vSAN software-defined storage platform. vSAN already offers VMDK storage to vSphere and the ability to host iSCSI volumes, but this feature will allow NFS and SMB file-shares to be hosted directly on the cluster without the need for a separate Windows Server or NFS provider.

What

Yanbing Lee and Duncan Epping discuss vSAN at VMworld Europe 2018

Yanbing Lee and Duncan Epping discuss vSAN at VMworld Europe 2018

vSAN Scalable File Services is a layer that sits on top of vSAN to provide SMB, NFS (and others in future) file shares. It’s comprised of a vSAN Distributed File System (vDFS) which provides the underlying scalable filesystem by aggregating vSAN objects, a Storage Services Platform which provides resilient file server end points, and a control plane for deployment and management.

File shares are created using the vCenter GUI or via API calls from an automation platform, and the demos at VMworld included all the functionality you’d expect with permissions, quotas and so on.

An interesting point is that all the file shares are integrated into the existing vSAN Storage Policy Based Management, and on a per-share basis. Therefore FTT, encryption,  thin provisioning, and so on can all be defined at a pretty granular level. So if only one of your file-shares has an encryption requirement that’s just a case of setting the policy in a drop down list, or likewise if a particular file-share must be configured to be site-failure resilient across a stretched cluster.

Why

Why would you want to do this? Well, a couple of use cases immediately sprang to mind. Firstly, the small office/ remote office/ branch office scenario. A company wants to host both virtual machines and file services in a compact environment- currently the choice would be to have a NAS plus compute hosts, or possibly go hyper-converged but run a VM within this serving the file data from a VMDK. vSAN file services simplifies this by providing that NFS/SMB provision from within the hypervisor- and this also means that all the benefits of resilience, deduplication, compression, and encryption can be provided to the file services.

The second case was for a SAN replacement- a traditional SAN is basically an expandable cluster of x86 servers loaded with disks running some file+disk management software. vSAN is the same thing, but can also run VM workloads. It would be an interesting price/feature comparison exercise to compare the two methodologies.

When

This offering is currently in Public Beta – details at the bottom of this article. NFS 4.1 with AD Authentication is expected at release, with SMB, OpenLDAP, vSAN Data Protection and other functionality to follow. Obviously this is all subject to change as VMware are still at the Beta stage, and a release date has not yet been confirmed.

Further Information

  • HCI3041BE – VMworld Europe 2018 session: Introducing Scalable File Storage on vSAN with Native File Services (Video and Slides)
  • HCI3728KE – VMworld Europe 2018 session:  Innovating Beyond HCI: How VMware is Driving the Next Data Center Revolution (Video)
  • www.vmware.com/go/vsan-beta – Sign up for the Beta. Phase 2 includes the ability to test vSAN File Services in your own lab environment.

VMworld Europe 2018