Category Archives: Uncategorized

IT Blog Award Winner

Wow.

Thanks to all those that voted for “IT Should Just Work” in the IT Blog Awards and passed the devious maths test at the bottom of the voting form. I’m shocked and humbled to let you all know that the results are in and this blog won the award for Best Analysis. It’s surprised me, and the flurry of social media activity through the weekend following the announcement has shown there’s some big winners in the other categories.

Cisco Blog Awards Winner

I’d recommend anyone reading this visits the IT Blog Awards page and checks out the other winning blogs. Congratulations all!

To quote the list:

Thanks again- it’s always good to know that someone reads what I write and (hopefully) finds it useful or informative.

IT Blog Awards

I’m pleased to announce this blog is a finalist in the 2018 IT Blog Awards hosted by Cisco in the category of “Best Analysis”. Voting is open to the tech community through January 4th 2019, so if you’ve found this blog useful or insightful at any point (or you’ve followed my advice and your datacentre didn’t catch fire as a result) please can you go to http://cs.co/itblogawards and pop in a vote for “IT Should Just Work” in the first section.

If you don’t want to vote for this blog, that’s fair enough, but I’d still recommend having a look at the voting form if only for the awesome “I’m not a bot” section at the bottom.

Thanks!

CiscoBlogAwards_Finalist_Best Analysis

vSAN Licensing: Expanding Clusters and Setting off Alerts

vSAN licenses are assigned per-cluster, so whilst the total number of vSAN licenses in a vCenter inventory might match the total number of vSAN host CPUs, they may not be assigned correctly to the clusters. This will trigger the critical vCenter alarm “License inventory monitoring”. This will also occur if a cluster is expanded (e.g. additional hosts and vSAN licenses are purchased) as it’s only possible to assign one license key to each cluster.

In the example screenshot here we have 2 vSAN license keys, each valid for 8 CPU. The total 16 CPU capacity matches the 16 CPU in use. However, one cluster has 10 CPUs (i.e. 5 dual socket hosts) and the other only 6 CPU. Therefore one license key is 2 CPU oversubscribed whilst the other has 2 free.

image

The method to resolve this is to use the MyVMware license portal to split and merge your pool of vSAN licenses until you have license keys where the capacities match your cluster sizes, and then re-license the vSAN environment. This VMware KB article explains in detail how to do this divide, and merging is a similar process on the same interface: https://kb.vmware.com/s/article/2006972

In the example screenshot above, this was a case of splitting one of the 8 CPUs into a 6 and a 2, and then merging that 2 with the remaining 8 CPU key to create a 10 CPU key and a 6 CPU key which matched the cluster sizes. The old 8-CPU key that was split was removed from the license inventory.

image

Goodbye VMTurbo, Hello turbonomic!

Big news today from workload monitoring and management vendor VMTurbo – The name has gone and the brand is now called “turbonomic”.

turbonomic logo

The name change emphasises several facets of the company’s product- not least that it’s not limited to Virtual Machines, or VMware. At a community briefing by Eric Wright last week the compatibilities with Microsoft Hyper-V, XenServer, RHEL, plus container and cloud platforms were highlighted just for starters.

What’s in a name? Continue reading