Tag Archives: ESXi

ESXi UNMAP not working on Replicated EqualLogic Volume

Symptoms

  • The VMware vSphere ESXi UNMAP command doesn’t release space on some or all volumes on a Dell EqualLogic SAN array running v8 firmware (may apply to other versions too). Using the following command in an SSH session to a 6.0u2 host (again, will apply to other versions):
    esxcli storage vmfs unmap –l MYVOLUMENAME
  • The volumes are VMFS5 (and always have been- they haven’t been upgraded from VMFS3).
  • Replication is enabled for the volumes that won’t rethin.

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Cause

UNMAP doesn’t work on the EqualLogic when Replication is enabled. It doesn’t return an error to the SSH session, and the temporary rethinning file is still created, but the disk is not thinned.

Solution

Disable replication on the volume, re-thin the volume using the UNMAP command, then re-configure replication. Unfortunately this means the entire volume must be re-copied to the replication partner and this may impact bandwidth usage and replication schedules on larger volumes.

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The All New vSphere 6.5

vmworldHighlights

  1. A new version of VMware vSphere, 6.5, will be released shortly
  2. Migration/Upgrade tools from previous versions (including Windows vCenter) to new VCSA.
  3. VCSA Native High Availability
  4. VCSA Integrated VMware Update Manager
  5. Native vCenter Backup and Restore
  6. Improved Appliance Management
  7. vSphere Clients
  8. Encryption

New vSphere coming soon

VMware has bucked the trend in versioning adopted by other major software companies and decided not to call it’s new vSphere version “10” and opted for the more traditional “vSphere 6.5” to succeed version 6.0 which was originally released back in March 2015. Announced at VMworld Europe 2016 with GA to follow, vSphere 6.5 is a continuation of the product which forms the core of the Software Defined Datacentre chunk of VMware’s “Any Cloud” Cross-Cloud Architecture portfolio. A lot of work has been put into making the experience of installing and operating a vSphere virtualised environment easier; Ignoring any improvements under the hood, and just looking at what’s on the surface there’s a whole bunch of features designed to make life run smoother for the IT Professional, some of which are highlighted in this post.

The new vCenter Server Appliance is a core part to this simplicity, and VMware have answered the requirements of anyone currently sticking to the Windows-based vCenter. If you can get more features and more reliability for less cost and less effort then it’s definitely the way forwards in my opinion. Some of the features discussed here- notably Native HA and Backup/Restore- will only be available in the appliance version of vCenter.

VCSA Upgrade and Migration

 

image Again out to both simplify the life of IT Professionals and encourage vCenter Appliance adoption, VMware has put a lot of effort into creating straightforward, and comprehensive, upgrade and migration tools. As more and more operations and data are handled by vCenter it becomes more and more important that the system can be smoothly navigated from version to version with minimal human effort.

Migrations are possible from Windows vCenters running version 5.5 or 6.0, and both the embedded and external database topologies are supported. Additionally, the new vCenter will assume the identity of the old Windows vCenter so any external interfaces, scripts, and automation should continue to work post-migration.

VCSA Native High Availability

VCSA 6.5 offers a built-in high availability deployment taking away the need for any 3rd party clustering or database solutions. The appliance deploys as an active/passive pair (plus witness) which automatically sets up replication of the integrated database and required vCenter files. The basic setup option also places these nodes intelligently using DRS and SDRS technology and automatically creates the necessary affinity rules and private IP comms, keeping everything simple. For infrastructures with unique and challenging topologies, there’s still an advanced workflow that can be used.

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Integrated VMware Update Manager

Prior to 6.5 using VUM to manage the patching of a vSphere infrastructure based on the vCenter Appliance has been, how can we put it?, “annoying”. After deploying the slick appliance it was then necessary to spin up (and license) a separate Windows VM just to handle the update system. This requirement has been removed in the new version- VUM is now integrated into the VCSA, enabled by default, and shares the same database instance. The new VUM integration also leverages the VCSA High Availability and Backup functionality.

Native vCenter Backup and Restore

Also new to the vCenter Server Appliance is integrated backup and restore functionality. A great step forward in the simplification of deploying a system this provides a built in solution to backup vCenter to an external location (SCP, SFTP, HTTPS locations for example) and then be able to recover by deploying a clean OVA and choosing the Restore option. image

 

Improved Appliance Management and Monitoring

The vCenter Server Appliance Management Interface- VAMI – has also had a makeover, with many features being added. The 6.0 version had an interface limited to changing IP and NTP settings, rebooting the appliance, and little else. 6.5 adds in built in monitoring of Network, CPU, Memory and the vPostgres database. There is also the option to configure Syslog for deeper external monitoring of the vCenter infrastructure- this allows fully verbose logs to be kept for auditing and troubleshooting processes.

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vCenter Server Appliance 6.0 Management Interface

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vCenter Server Appliance 6.5 Management Interface

vSphere Client(s)

Work continues to focus on delivering a fully functioned HTML5 client, but in the interim vCenter 6.5 will come shipped with a new (limited) HTML5 based “vSphere Client”- evolved from the current fling – as well as an improved flash based “vSphere Web Client”. Expect the “vSphere Client” to see continuous improvement and feature addition through the lifetime of the platform –driven through the Fling programme.

Encryption

As with the other topics here encryption in the new vSphere could easily be a post in itself (or a whole series), but to summarise the new features in this area, vSphere is now offering built-in VM encryption. The encryption happens between the VM and the storage so is invisible to the guest.

Local keys are generated within vSphere, and encrypted using keys held in an external (third-party) KMS- this would usually be managed by the IT Security team. Back in vCenter encryption is implemented through Storage Policies, so a VM can be encrypted simply by assigning the correct policy to it. Through the GUI (or API/PowerCLI) it’s possible to set  encryption covering  the Disks, the VMX/Swap files, or the whole lot on a per-VM basis. Through the API/PowerCLI it’s also possible to arrange encryption on a per-VHD level, potentially encrypting different disks on a VM with different keys.

VSAN encryption is on the way- there’s currently an ongoing beta – but will not be available in the 6.5 release. Based on the recent cadence I’d expect to see something in Spring 2017, but that’s just my speculation.

Summary

In summary, there’s lots to look for in the new vSphere release and in particular the vCenter Server Applicance. This week’s VMworld should reveal a lot more in depth into these advances.

vSphere HTML5 Web Client

HTML5 Fling iconWith ESXi 6.0 update 2 we were treated to a HTML-based web host client. This meant we were no longer confined to using the Windows (“C++”) client for host management, however it was still necessary to use the Flash-based web client for managing a vCenter infrastructure. The vSphere HTML5 Web Client is the solution to this- providing a HTML5, standards-based, web front end to a VMware virtual infrastructure. The product is currently in the “Fling” stage- so it’s out there to try but not quite finished to “production” standards yet.

vSphere Web Client

vSphere Web Client Fling running in Chrome on Windows Desktop

In my Homelab environment, installation was simple- I downloaded and deployed the OVA from the Flings website and then followed the comprehensive instructions on the vSphere Blog. Within a few minutes I had the client up and running and it sits alongside the existing host client and flash-based vCenter client (via VCSA) so all my existing management interfaces are preserved.

vSphere Web Client

vSphere Web Client Fling running in Edge on Windows Mobile

So, what does this give me? Well, apart from giving an insight into the future direction of the VMware hypervisor management console, it allows me to do basic vCenter management tasks from my mobile phone or non-flash compatible portable devices (although there’s a little way to go to make the app really usable on my mobile at least- see screenshot). I’ve blogged before about using the Host client on the Xbox One, and now it’s possible to manage some vCenter functions from the console too.

With the news that the “fat” C++ based Windows client will be depreciated in the next release of vSphere having started being phased out in version 5.5, I’m looking forward to seeing where this goes.

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Timeout Value on vSphere Host Client

If you’re running the HTML ESXi Host Client that comes with version 6.0 Update 2, you may find your screen reverting to the login prompt after only a short period of inactivity. This is because there’s an Application Timeout setting that defaults to 15 minutes.

Application Timeout

Application Timeout setting (Click for full size image)


To change this setting login to the host client and locate the user@host drop down menu in the top right hand corner, select “Client Settings” and then “Application timeout”. The timeout can be set to 15, 30, 60, or 120 minutes, or disabled completely.

In an important production environment it’s obviously more secure to keep this enabled as it will prevent you accidentally leaving yourself logged into the client and open to malicious passers wreaking havoc on your infrastructure. However, in a test environment, or your Home Lab, it’s probably quite safe to lengthen or disable this timeout assuming that you’re not concerned about small family members or pets getting hold of the mouse and playing with your VMs.